Our Staff

Sarah Bradham

Sarah Bradham

Executive Director

Sarah has 23 years of experience in the nonprofit world including extensive experience in nonprofit management, fundraising, corporate relations, event management, database management, graphic design, communications, and marketing. Sarah had her own personal growth experience when she adopted her pup Quiggley in 2017 from the Oregon Humane Society. She learned first hand the challenges of training an adult dog, and expanded her own patience and compassion during that process. She is thrilled to take the reins at an organization that is dedicated to serving youth, providing powerful growth opportunities, and training and finding forever homes for dogs. 

In her most recent position, Sarah spent 8 years at the Mazamas, a Portland nonprofit focused on mountain education and recreation, in roles ranging from Communications Director to Executive Director. She also spent 14 years at Saturday Academy. Sarah served on the Board of Directors of Girls on the Run of Portland Metro from 2015–2019, and was the Board President from 2018–2019, leading the organization through an Executive Director transition.

During her downtime, Sarah enjoys trail running, backpacking, volunteering at the Oregon Humane Society, and spending time with her husband, and their 18-year old kitty, Leo, and 8-year old pup, Quiggley.

 

Hayley Anderson

Hayley Anderson

Communications & Donor Relations Manager

Most days Hayley can be found hanging out with her pup Addie and tending to her many, many plants. When the lovely northwest weather allows she enjoys spending time in the woods or on the water in her kayak.

Hayley is a strong believer in the human-dog connection and its power to change lives for the better.

Makai Brusa

Makai Brusa

Kennel Staff (employed by OYA)

Makai has been working with the youth and dogs at the kennel for 25 years. In addition to mentoring the youth and going to county shelters to select dogs for the program, Makai enjoys spending time outdoors. Some of his favorite activities include skiing, hiking, and climbing.

He loves bringing his sweet dog Taz (a POOCH alum!) along with him wherever he goes, whether it’s on a hike through the mountains or a long walk along the river or beach.

He’s also a full-time dad who enjoys spending time with his sons.

Board of Directors

Fred Carter

Fred Carter

Board President

Fred has been dedicating his time and energy to Project POOCH for 26 years in addition to serving as a CPA.

When he’s not leading the Project POOCH board meetings (with a Diet Coke in hand) or preparing taxes, he enjoys spending time with his family.

Although he doesn’t have any pets of his own currently, he loves that the youth and dogs at Project POOCH bring out the best in one another and help each other grow.

Joanie Joyce

Joanie Joyce

Board Secretary

Joanie was born in Guam but now splits her time between two of the most beautiful states – Oregon and Hawaii.

In addition to serving as the board secretary at Project POOCH, Joanie volunteers as a Court Appointed Special Advocate for CASA and GAL.

Although she doesn’t have any furry sidekicks of her own, she is the auntie to many adorable dogs and enjoys seeing the powerful connections made between dogs and people. She is also a chocolate and beer enthusiast.

Tracy Sampson

Tracy Sampson

Board Member

When she’s not helping rescue dogs and youth at Project POOCH, Tracy can be found in a ballet class or on a backpacking adventure. Years ago, she even climbed Oregon’s beloved Mount Hood.

Often accompanying her on her adventures is her dog Fenway, an adorable Labrador Retriever/Doberman mix, who she adopted from Project POOCH!

Tracy is forever grateful for Project POOCH for bringing her soulmate Fenway into her life.

Michele Mannix

Michele Mannix

Board Member

Before settling down in Portland, Michele lived in New York, San Francisco, Hawaii, and Massachusetts.

In addition to traveling with her family and hanging out with her sweet boy Blazer (a POOCH alum!), Michele enjoys eating at the Portland food carts and jogging. She also keeps busy by teaching college students about addiction and mental health.

Her favorite thing about Project POOCH is witnessing the connection between the dogs and their trainers, and the positive changes that occur as a result.

Kevin Schrouder

Kevin Schrouder

Board Member

When Kevin’s not helping out at Project POOCH or working at TCC Verizon, he enjoys spending time with his wife and his adorable baby girl.

He also has two sweet fur babies – Doyle the Dachshund and Spots the Cattle Dog Mix. Spots is a Project POOCH alum, and although he is deaf, he is the happiest and goodest boy ever!

Kevin is grateful that Project POOCH helps underdogs like Spots find their forever homes.

Mike Paulsen

Mike Paulsen

Board Member

After spending nearly two decades implementing integrated marketing campaigns and retail design strategies for Nike, Columbia Sportswear, and other for-profit companies, Mike was inspired by the opportunity to make a difference by forging nonprofit community partnerships and attended the Portland State University’s Institute of Nonprofit Management.

Since then, he has worked at several nonprofits developing and overseeing signature fundraising campaigns.

Living in the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area, Mike shares three acres with four sheep, two rescue dogs, two rescue cats, two cockatiels, several rainbow fish, a turtle, and his partner, Dan.

Maiya Martin Burbank

Maiya Martin Burbank

Board Member

Maiya is the mother to several amazing animals, including Mr. Fitz, who she describes as “a pure delight in dog form that is a mix of breeds known only to his mother” and Thelma, Henrietta, and Leticia who are chickens.

In addition to serving on the board at Project POOCH, she spends her time advocating for older adult and senior visibility in government, medical, and social policy. When she has some downtime, she can be found cheering on the Buffalo Bills, quilting, reading, or watching The Mandalorian again.

Her favorite thing about Project POOCH is the way it gives both humans and animals opportunities in life that might not otherwise be available.